Social Media, Censorship, Fake News, and Sacha Baron Cohen

Before I begin, I’d like to fully acknowledge that you have likely read the buzzwords (besides Sacha Baron Cohen) in the title at least a million times. And for that, I apologize. But here it goes. The other night during a debate between British PM Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn, his opponent from the Labour […]

Anti-Vaxx and Climate Change: Why Are We Still Debating?

In an article by Lena H. Sun of the Washington post, it is revealed that the majority of anti-vaccination ads are funded by just two organizations. I’m not writing this post to rail against the dangers of anti-vaxxers. The scientific community has been very clear, vaccines do not cause autism. So you don’t need to […]

Is The International Criminal Court Serving Its Purpose?

Today the International Criminal Court found the Congolese general Bosco Ntaganda guilty on eighteen counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity. As a result, he was sentenced to thirty years in prison. Ida Sawyer, the deputy director of Human Rights Watch’s Africa division, is quoted as saying “Bosco Ntaganda’s 30-year sentence sends a strong […]

The Case Against Boycotts

As a student of International Relations one of the topics I have discussed in class more than once is social movements; people who band together and peacefully protest in order to create political or societal change. I, like most Americans, enthusiastically support everyone’s right to protest and participate in social movements. However, it seems that […]

A reflection on interdisciplinary so far, websites, and so on

Since the first reflection we have covered Hypothesis, a tool for annotating online resources, two articles about using website domains as a part of academia, the introduction to Eports, and Creative Commons licensing. The Hypothesis tool is nifty but I do not see myself using it over just handwriting notes, even though my handwriting is […]